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Dogs put best foot forward for charity walk – Northglen News

Lisa Beard, Craig Mostert, Sphelele Gassa, Front L-R Tanith King & Debbie Muller.

PEOPLE of all ages and fitness levels, and their four-legged furry friends are invited to participate in the 4th Annual Sunflower Doggy Fun Walk in support of The Sunflower Fund.

The event is held in association with Village Veterinary Clinic, Petwise and co-organiser Debbie Muller of Cute Marketing Solutions.

This fun, family outdoor event takes place on Sunday, 27 August at the Kloof Country Club cricket field and starts at 9am with registration taking place between 8am and 8.45am.

Entrance is R50 for a dog or a person and includes a 2017 signature Sunflower TOPE (Tube of Hope) and a goodie bag for the first 200 dogs.

Only socialised dogs on leashes will be allowed entry and wastage bags will be provided for owners to pick up after their pets.

For pre-registered bookings and further information, please contact Tanith King on 031 266 1148 or email tanith@sunflowerfund.org.za.

For more information on The Sunflower Fund or how to become a blood stem cell donor, please visit http://www.sunflowerfund.org.za or call toll free 0800 12 10 82.

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Fast facts about cloning – WPSD Local 6

(CNN) — Here’s some background information aboutcloning, a process of creating an identical copy of an original.

Facts: Reproductive Cloning is the process of making a full living copy of an organism. Reproductive cloning of animals transplants nuclei from body cells into eggs that have had their nucleus removed. That egg is then stimulated to divide using an electrical charge and is implanted into the uterus of a female.

Therapeutic Cloningis the process where nuclear transplantation of a patient’s own cells makes an oocyte from which immune-compatible cells (especiallystem cells) can be derived for transplant. These cells are stimulated to divide and are grown in a Petri dish rather than in the uterus.

Timeline: 1952 – Scientists demonstrate they can remove the nucleus from a frog’s egg, replace it with the nucleus of an embryonic frog cell, and get the egg to develop into a tadpole.

1975 -Scientists get tadpoles after transferring cell nuclei from adult frogs.

1986 -Sheep cloned by nuclear transfer from embryonic cells.

February 22, 1997 -Scientists reveal Dolly the sheep, the first mammal to be cloned from cells of an adult animal. She was actually born on July 5, 1996.

1998 -More than 50 mice are reported cloned from a single mouse over several generations. Eight calves are cloned from a cow.

2000 -Pigs and goats are reported cloned from adult cells.

2001 -Advanced Cell Technology of Worcester, Massachusetts, says it produced a six-cell cloned human embryo, in research aimed at harvesting stem cells.

2001 -Five bulls are cloned from a champion bull, Full Flush.

2002 -Rabbits and a kitten are reported cloned from adult cells.

December 27, 2002 – Clonaid claims to produce first human clone, a baby girl, Eve.

January 23, 2003 -Clonaid claims to have cloned the first baby boy. The baby was allegedly cloned from tissue taken from the Japanese couple’s comatose 2-year-old boy, who was killed in an accident in 2001. Clonaid has never provided physical evidence of the cloning.

February 14, 2003 -The Roslin Institute confirms that Dolly, the world’s first cloned mammal, was euthanized after being diagnosed with progressive lung disease. She was 6 years old.

May 4, 2003 -The first mule is cloned at the University of Idaho, named Idaho Gem.

June 9, 2003 -Researchers Gordon Woods and Dirk Vanderwall from the University of Idaho and Ken White from Utah State University claim to have cloned a second mule.

August 6, 2003 -Italian scientists at the Laboratory of Reproductive Technology in Cremona, Italy, say they have created the world’s first cloned horse, Prometea, from an adult cell taken from the horse who gave birth to her.

September 25, 2003 -French scientists at the National Institute of Agricultural Research at Joy en Josas, France, become the first to clone rats.

February 12, 2004 -South Korean researchers report they have created human embryos through cloning and extracted embryonic stem cells. Findings by a team of researchers were presented to South Korean scientists and describe in detail the process of how to create human embryos by cloning. The report says the scientists used eggs donated by Korean women. An investigative panel concludes in 2006 that South Korean scientist Woo Suk Hwang’s human stem cell cloning research was faked.

August 3, 2005 -South Korean researchers announce they have successfully cloned a dog, an Afghan hound named Snuppy.

December 8, 2008-April 4, 2009 -Five cloned puppies from Trakr, a German Shepherd Sept.11 Ground Zero rescue dog, are born.

May 2009 -Clone of Tailor Fit, a two-time quarter horse world champion, is born, one of several cloned horses born that year.

September 29, 2011 -At South Korea’s Incheon Airport, seven “super clone” sniffer-dogs are dispatched to detect contraband luggage. They are all golden Labrador Retrievers that are genetically identical to “Chase,” who was the top drug detention canine until he retired in 2007.

May 15, 2013 -Oregon Health & Science University researchers report in the journal Cell that they have created embryonic stem cells through cloning. Shoukhrat Mitalipov and the biologistsproduced human embryos using skin cells, and then used the embryos to produce stem cell lines.

April 2014 -For the first time,cloning technologies have been used to generate stem cells that are genetically matched to adult patients.Researchers put the nucleus of an adult skin cell inside an egg, and that reconstructed egg went through the initial stages of embryonic development, according to research published this month.

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Fast facts about cloning – WPSD Local 6

Northern Ireland mum fighting MS: Russian medics are now my last hope – Belfast Telegraph

Northern Ireland mum fighting MS: Russian medics are now my last hope

BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

A young Co Down mum is bravely undergoing a gruelling stem cell transplant in Russia in what she believes is her last hope of enjoying some quality of life.

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/northern-ireland-mum-fighting-ms-russian-medics-are-now-my-last-hope-36023340.html

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/life/features/article36023337.ece/4289a/AUTOCROP/h342/2017-08-12_lif_33652492_I8.JPG

A young Co Down mum is bravely undergoing a gruelling stem cell transplant in Russia in what she believes is her last hope of enjoying some quality of life.

Lindsay Rice (35) from Warrenpoint has exhausted every treatment on the health service – including chemotherapy normally given to cancer patients – in the hope of treating the chronic condition Rapidly Evolving Severe Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

Paralysis and temporary sight loss are just a few of the many debilitating symptoms which have left the mum-of-two unable to enjoy normal family life.

Desperate to get her help, her family launched an appeal on Facebook and Go Fund Me to raise 50,000 to send her to the National Pirogov Medical Surgical Centre in Moscow where she arrived two weeks ago to start her stem cell transplant.

The treatment alone is expected to cost up to 45,000 and, incredibly, in just 12 weeks the family has raised 32,000 towards a 50,000 target thanks to generous support from friends and the public.

Lindsay, who is married to Liam (36), a financial advisor, has two children, Jamie (17) and Olivia (8).

Liam says: “This is her last hope and she is doing it for her family and her kids and that’s what she is focusing on. She just wants to be able to live a normal life and do normal things with the family.”

Since starting her treatment on August 1 she has been keeping a daily dairy of her progress through a Facebook page – Lindsay’s Last Hope.

While the groundbreaking treatment known as HSCT (Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant) is not a cure for MS, Lindsay’s hope is that it will halt the progression of the disease and stop the frequent and severe relapses which are destroying her health.

Lindsay will spend a month in the clinic, most of it in isolation, and when she comes home she faces a long recovery period when she will have to remain isolated for up to a year due to the risk of infection.

HSCT aims to ‘reset’ the immune system to stop it attacking the central nervous system. It uses chemotherapy to remove the harmful immune cells and then rebuild the immune system using a type of stem cell found in the patient’s bone marrow.

The haematopoietic stem cells used in the treatment can produce all the different cells in the blood, including immune cells. However, they can’t regenerate permanently damaged nerves or other parts of the brain and spinal cord.

Lindsay has successfully had over two million stem cells extracted in a tough procedure which involved having a catheter inserted into her jugular vein. She has also had her head shaved this week in preparation for starting chemotherapy today.

The chemotherapy will wipe out her immune system and she will then have her stem cells transplanted back into her blood by a drip to help regrow a new, stronger immune system.

She will then have to spend 10 days in complete isolation while her new immune system builds.

Also, since arriving in Russia she has been told that her MS is now much worse than she realised and is now at the Secondary Progressive stage.

People with Secondary Progressive MS don’t tend to recover completely from a relapse and can expect a general worsening of symptoms, making the treatment even more time-critical.

In a further blow, tests have picked up a potentially dangerous three-centimetre active lesion on her spine which wasn’t spotted during MRI’s here.

Lindsay faces a tough few weeks in her bid to halt the progression of the disease but as her husband Liam explains, the alternative is the prospect of life in a wheelchair: “Lindsay has come through a lot since her teens.

“She had Jamie quite young at 18 and her condition seemed to really deteriorate after that. She went to a lot of consultants and had many tests but it wasn’t until after she had Olivia that she was finally diagnosed in 2011.

“She never knows from day to day how it will affect her. Fatigue is the number one problem and that is crippling. I would come home from work and after dinner she has to go to bed, and even sleep doesn’t help it.

“It stops her from doing simple things like taking our daughter to the park or taking the dog for a walk.

“Her motability is not as good as an average person and the other big issue is the relapses.

“They have become very frequent and each relapse is worse in terms of how severe it is. During her last one in February she had to go into hospital and also had to use a walking frame.

“A common misconception is that after each relapse you go back to normal but that’s not the case. It leaves its mark and any damage done is permanent. The nature of the relapses could leave her in a wheelchair.”

It was after her last relapse and having exhausted all options for treatment on the Health Service that Lindsay decided she wanted to try HSCT.

Her neurologist in Belfast supported her decision and the family applied to the Russian clinic just 12 weeks ago expecting to wait up to two years before admission.

They were surprised to be offered a cancellation on August 1 leaving them facing a race against time to raise 50,000 to cover the cost of treatment and expenses.

Liam says: “We thought we would have at least 12 months and up to two years to get the money together and it has been amazing to see how people have rallied round and what they have done just from the kindness of their hearts, especially strangers.

“We’ve had quizzes and coffee mornings and online auctions and I recently did the Four Peaks challenge with a group of friends. Lindsay’s mum and her best friend are organising a lot of events and we still have some way to go but we are amazed at how much has been raised and donated in such a short time.”

Liam flew to Russia with Lindsay on July 31 and stayed with her for five days while she underwent tests to determine that she was suitable for the treatment.

It has already been a punishing two weeks for Lindsay who has come through a batch of invasive procedures including having a catheter inserted in her jugular to extract the stem cells.

Liam says: “It is an intense treatment and Lindsay is so positive and coping brilliantly. She got her hair cut short before she went and decided to have it shaved this week before the chemo starts and it falls out.

“She will have to spend 10 days in complete isolation to allow her immune system to build again and that will be tough.

“She will hopefully be home after 30 days and then when she comes home she will have a long recovery and will have to isolate herself from society for up to a year to keep her safe from infection.

“We will have to deep clean the house and we will all have to wear face masks as she can’t risk even getting a cold.”

Liam is back at work and trying to keep things as normal as possible at home for the couple’s two children, who he said are coping well: “Jamie is 17 and approaching adulthood and understands why she is doing it and is okay, but obviously his mum is away and he has his sixth year exam results coming and he misses her.

“Olivia seems to be fine too. She understands her mum has MS, which stops her doing things with her and she knows this treatment is to help her to be a better mother.

“I’ve been trying as much as possible to keep her occupied with play dates and sleepovers.”

The couple have been impressed by the level of care in the clinic and Lindsay has had the chance to meet and get to know other MS patients from all over the world.

Liam has nothing but admiration for her strength and the positive way she is enduring the extreme procedures she faces.

He adds: “Lindsay is the most determined person you could ever possibly meet. She has had bad days and it can be demoralising for her but she is determined to be as positive as she can be.

“It is not a cure. MS doesn’t have a cure but we hope it will stop the progress of the disease. We just hope it will halt it by rebooting her immune system and hopefully stop the severe relapses.”

Liam adds: “It is desperately hard and stressful for all of us and we have to put a positive spin, in the grand scheme of things it is just for a month of her life.”

Follow Lindsay’s journey at Facebook/Lindsay’s Last Hope – HSCT in Russia

Fundraising continues as the family has only until the end of the month to reach their target. You can support this young mum in her bid to enjoy a normal quality of life by going to https://www.gofundme.com/lindsay-slasthope

Belfast Telegraph

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Northern Ireland mum fighting MS: Russian medics are now my last hope – Belfast Telegraph

Burn on race track ticks off Wellington leukemia sufferer’s bucket list – Stuff.co.nz

MIRI SCHROETER

Last updated19:11, August 5 2017

Miri Schroeter / Stuff.co.nz

A Wellington man who was given weeks to live is ticking off his bucket list by shredding some rubber on the race track in his Nissan Skyline.

On Friday, he could barely manage to walk out to the garage. But the chance to make his dream come true carriedJarred Townsend tothe racetrack on Saturday.

Diagnosed with leukemia, Townsend, 24, hasbeen told he has just weeks to live.

But taking theNissan Skyline he hasspent two years building out on the Manfeild track was on his bucket list for his final weeks.

DAVID UNWIN/STUFF

Jarred Townsend, 24, with his partner Christie McAllister who came to watch him tick off racing from his bucket list.

“[Racing]is really going to be the icing on the cake,” said Townsend, of Wellington.”The past week my health has taken a bit of a fall but I’m feeling so good today and happy I can be here.”

READ MORE: *Bucket list teen Joshua Hetherington dies after two-year battle*New Zealand’s top 10 dream experiences revealed

Townsend began his battle withleukemia almost two years ago.He underwent three lots ofchemotherapy and astem celltransplant, but relapsed about two months ago and was given two weeks to live.

DAVID UNWIN/STUFF

Townsend gets ready to burn some rubber on Manfeild race track.

Getting the car finished and out on the Fielding trackwas one of histop priorities, he said.

Barry Townsend said his son was so crook he couldn’t even walk out to the garageon Friday

But he was such a “petrol head” just like his parents and pulled through, Barry said.

DAVID UNWIN/STUFF

Townsend with his father Barry Townsend (left) and pro drifter Jason Olivecrona.

“He had two or three motors in this before he was inspired by this motor.”

Jarred’s stepfather, George Hibberthad been a huge help in getting the car race-ready, Barry said.

Hibberthad worked tirelessly on it the past two months to get it up to scratch.

DAVID UNWIN/STUFF

Townsend with his family and friends at the track.

Jarred’s mother, Jenny Hibbert, said the past few weeks had been touch and go.

Since Jarred was diagnosed with cancer it had been tough going for the whole family, but seeing himenjoy the day was great, she said.

Unfortunately Jarred was too sick this week to tick off spending a night at a bach with his friends, Hibbert said.

He was supposed to have a sleepover with 12 of his mates, she said.

Jarred also still planned toget family portrait photos takenand he wanted to have a photo shoot with his dog, Hibbert said. These are booked in for the nextweek.

-Stuff

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Lisbon police officer shoots dog after it allegedly attacked him | WGME – WGME

Police lights (Thinkstock)

LISBON FALLS (WGME) — Lisbon Police say an officer shot a dog after it attacked him while he was responding to a well-being check Wednesday.

Police say Officer Andrew Levesque responded to 2 Claire Drive in Lisbon Falls.

After knocking on the door, police say Officer Levesque noticed a dog barking aggressively on the other side.

Police say the homeowner opened the door while holding onto the dogs collar, and the dog pulled away and charged at Levesque.

According to police, the dog then bit Levesques hand and he kicked the dog.

He then jumped off the front stairs and warned the homeowner to control their dog, according to police.

The homeowner attempted to grab the dog without success, and the dog lunged, biting Levesque a second time in the thigh, according to police. Levesque again kicked the dog, breaking contact.

The dog attacked Levesque a third time, biting him in the opposite thigh.

Levesque fought the dog off again, simultaneously drawing his firearm and shooting three rounds into the dog, according to police.

Police say the dog ran under a nearby vehicle before fleeing away from the residence.

Levesque received medical attention at Central Maine Medical Center for the injuries suffered during the attacks, according to police.

He received a series of rabies vaccinations, because police say the dog did not receive its required vaccinations.

Levesque has since been released from CMMC.

Police say the 5-year-old pit bull mix was later found and taken to a veterinary hospital where it was euthanized due to the wounds it received.

However, the dog’s owner says the dog was a Rhodesian ridgeback and not a pit bull mix.

Lisbon Police had previously summonsed the dogs owner, 70-year-old Vernon Hamilton, on July 18 for keeping an unlicensed dog, failure to vaccinate a dog, and allowing a dog to be at large after the dog reportedly attacked a neighbors dog and acted aggressive towards the owner.

At the time, police say Hamilton said he was the owner of the dog, but on Wednesday Hamilton said the dog was owned by his 22-year-old grandson.

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Lisbon police officer shoots dog after it allegedly attacked him | WGME – WGME

UB hosts bioethics debate, escape from the "echo chamber" – WBFO

The University at Buffalo has wrapped up an annual two-day conference, during which many controversial philosophical points of view were brought up. This year, keynote speakers were addressing questions and offering arguments that were not for the easily offended. But that’s exactly how participants wanted it. As they see it, the willingness to make controversial arguments is a disappearing trend on college campuses.

WBFO’s Michael Mroziak reports.

UB’sPhilosophy Department hosted their fifth-annualRomanelloConference, formerly known as the PANTC Conference, and this year’s theme was PersonalIdenityand Human Origins. Among the questions raised during the weekend: when does human life actually begin? At conception? A very short period of time after? Midway through a pregnancy? Or not until the moment of birth?

About the only light and fluffy materials at the conference were the coffee, fruits and pastries.

“It’s of interest in itself, when we came into existence, but because of issues like abortion and embryonic stem cell research which destroys the embryo, if we once were an early embryo the first few days, then we would have been our destruction,” said DavidHershenov, professor of philosophy atUB. “The ethical consequences of our origins makes these issues contentious.”

But contentious talk was desired. The conference welcomed three keynote speakers who took varying positions on when life begins. MaryaSchechtman, professor of philosophy at the University of Illinois at Chicago, was one of them. She took a position that life begins closer to conception, stopping short of picking an exact moment.

“The argument I try to make is that choosing one of those depends on the context you’re in,” she said. “In different cultures and in different times and places, human life might actually begin at different points within the development from fertilization to birth.”

Guests have previously published controversial works. Don Marquis, professor emeritus of philosophy at the University of Kansas, has written several papers including “Why Abortion is Immoral” and “AreDCDDonors Dead?” In the latter paper, he argues that a Donation After Cardiac Death organ donor is not necessarily dead and, thus, transplant surgeons may be killing still-living humans.

But if there’s one thing to which he and his fellow guests agreed, it’s that the willingness to argue varying points of view, and the willingness to listen to other points of view, is fading.

“I think it’s terribly important and I think universities do a terrible job exposing people to different points of view,” Marquis said.

There were no safe spaces to be found at this conference. The program notes contained some satirical “trigger warnings,” ranging from “views that will offend the politically incorrect as well as the PC snowflake” to “views that will make you need to pet a therapy dog.”

“We meet every month, so we know each other’s views and where they stand. We’re no longer shocked at each other,” Hershenovsaid. “Our ideas get better by bouncing them off our opponents. You don’t want to just be the echo chamber, as what all-too-often happens.”

John Lizza, philosophy professor at Kutztown University and one of the keynote presenters, agreed with the need to test one’s beliefs.

“It challenges ideas. It challenges what people think,” Lizza said. “One ought to be open to having one’s own views challenged. If they’re worth their salt, they’ll hold up.”

But whether it’s within social media platforms, television news viewing habits or even within college classrooms, the challenge is getting people to come out from their comfort zones and test their views.

“It’s important not only to get out of the bubble of thinking what you think, but it’s also important to think about what you’re basing it on, where those thoughts came from, how you came to have them,” Schechtman said. “That’s something philosophy is particularly good at.”

Other topics discussed during the weekend conference were the transgender issue and personal identification and whether physicians deserve the salaries they receive.

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UB hosts bioethics debate, escape from the "echo chamber" – WBFO

Experimental stem cells could help dogs suffering from arthritis – FOX 46 Charlotte

FOX 46 WJZY – By age 10 up to 80 percent of dogs will develop arthritis. It can make it difficult for them to walk, stand or even move, but the experimental use of stem cells from young dogs could helprejuvenatejoints in older animals.

Brian Cirillo is concerned about his four-year-old dog Cosby’s health.

“He’s always the last one to kind of get moving and if he’s laying down for a long time he takes a long time to stand up,” Cirillo said.

Initially acting as fosters, Brian adopted Cosby and his two siblings when they were just four weeks old, bringing the total number of rescue dogs at their home up to six.

“He’s the only one that’s so scared of everything and I’m starting to wonder now if it’s because he’s in pain, you know, and he doesn’t want to have to get out of a situation or something,” saidCirillo.

To diagnose Cosby’s problem he’s getting a physical exam, X-rays, and blood tests, but there’s a possibility Cosby could qualify to get something else– an injection of experimental stem cells into his joint.

“We’re looking at taking the miraculous healing capabilities of the body, concentrating it, and then bringing it back to the body and we’re not seeing a lot of side effects,”Cirillosaid.

Veterinarian Dr. Michael Amsberry owns the St. Francis Pet Care Center, one of several sites across the county taking part in a clinical trial testing whether specially grown stem cells made by animal cell therapies in San Diego will help arthritis symptoms in dogs.

“Specifically this study is knees, hips, elbows and shoulders but the most common in this study is hips,” Dr. Amsberry said.

The cells are grown from umbilical cord blood.

“So what they’ve done is harvested little umbilical cords from c-sections from dogs and they isolate these cells. They grow them up, they can culture them up to hundreds of millions of cells so from one sample they can treat thousands of dogs,” said Dr. Amsberry.

The treatment is free and Dr. Amsberry says so far he’s injected eight dogs.

“Any downside, we just haven’t seen any downsides period,” he said.

It’s an experimental option Brian hopes will work for Cosby.

“If he gets older and keeps getting worse that’s never good so if we can try to get ahead of the problem with stem cells and actually cure the problem and he doesnt have to be on a lot of chemicals and medicines his whole life, that would be great,” saidCirillo.

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Experimental stem cells could help dogs suffering from arthritis – FOX 46 Charlotte

Rogue chromosome may be behind new contagious cancer striking Tasmanian devils – Science Magazine

Tasmanian devils are now facing a second transmissible cancer, but both tumor types trace back to the same unstable chromosome.

CraigRJD/iStockphoto

By Elizabeth PennisiJul. 10, 2017 , 11:15 AM

AUSTINThe Tasmanian devil was nearly wiped out 20 years ago when a contagious tumor began disfiguring its face and killing animals by the hundreds. Since then, some individuals developed resistanceand conservationists breathed a sigh of relief. But a second cancer has recently popped up in southeastern Tasmaniaand it may reveal the Achillesheel that allows these cancers to develop, researchers reported here last week at the annual meeting of the Society for Molecular Biology &Evolution.

Having two of these unusual tumors arise in such a short space of time really concerns me, says study leader Janine Deakin, a geneticist at the University of Canberra.

The second cancer started showing up in 2014, when Tasmanian researchers discovered five Tasmanian devils with facial tumors. Like the first cancer, the tumors grew so large that they prevented the animals from eating. And, like the first, the cancer spread from animal to animal, as the devils bit and kicked each other during frequent confrontations. To find out whetherthe second cancer was related to the first, Deakin and colleagues performed a genetic analysis.

The original cancer was caused when sex chromosomes shattered. Some pieces attached themselves to one of the devils larger chromosomeschromosome 1and others rearranged themselves at various other spots in the genome, Deakins group reported in 2012. Chromosome 1 is also involved in the second cancer, she told meeting attendees, but the rearrangements elsewhere in the genome are not as extreme. In this second cancer, chromosome 6 is missing and instead has fused with chromosome 1.

The rearrangements may be due to an unusual configuration of telomeres, the caps at the ends of chromosomes that protect them from sticking to each other. Normally, telomeres get shorter with each cell division. But in Tasmanian devils, chromosomes passed on to offspring by the mother already have short telomeres; whereas those from the dad have extra-long ones. It does seem that the shorter telomere may have something to do with the transmissible tumors, says Deakin, as such premature shortening may make chromosomes prone to merging.

The odd telomeres may explain why the tumor gets started, but not how it infects other devils. The teams analysis confirmed that, as with the first cancer, the tumor cells are not the infected devils own. Instead, they stem from a rogue cell that spreads from animal to animal as they fight.

One explanation for the rise of the new cancer is that chromosome 1 is particularly fragile. Unlike other chromosomes, it has rearranged its genes many times over the eons as marsupials, from koalas to opossums, have evolved. It is hard to understand why such a weird feature would persist or would have evolved in the first place, Deakin says.

Other researchers agree. Im fascinated by thinking about cancer as an evolutionary problem, says Daniel Bolnick, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Texas herewho was not involved with the work. In a sense, the body is a cooperative society of cells, and tumor cells are those that cheat. They look out only for themselves by hoarding the bodys resources to fuel unconstrained growth. In most cancers, the cheaters lose out in the end, because they kill the body they are cheating on. But these transmissible cancers not only evade the devils immune system, but are also able to move to new bodies and perpetuate. Its as if they are a new species, he notes.

The tumors might also be the remnants of an old species, says Laurent Frantz, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom who studies the DNA of ancient and modern dogs. At the meeting, he showed just how well the canine version of a transmissible cancer has done for itself. Most modern dogs in the Americas descend from European stock and have very little DNA from the precontact dogs, which arrived thousands of years ago with the first people who walked into the Americas from Asia. But the DNA of the dog-transmissible cancer, CTVT, is very similar to that of the first American dogs, suggesting it arose early in American dog history. Today, this nonlethal tumor is found in dogs all over the world. Its the last remains of these precontact dogs that were all across the Americas for thousands of years, Frantz says.

To date, the only other species with a transmissible cancer is a soft-shell clam. But, Bolnick asks, if such tumors have evolved in dogs, Tasmanian devils, and soft-shell clams, Where else are we going to start to find them?

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Rogue chromosome may be behind new contagious cancer striking Tasmanian devils – Science Magazine

New research shows that all dog breeds come from the gray wolf – Bosveld Review

Dogs and humans have been living together for at least 15 000 years.

Dogs were domesticated thousands of years ago as companions to humans and bred for different traits. The desired traits changed over the centuries resulting in different breeds.

As humans migrated to different places on the planet over the millennia, their dogs went with them.

A team of researchers has assembled the most comprehensive genomic map on dogs to date. The results were published in the journal Cell Reports.

Researchers gathered blood samples or mouth scrapings from 1,346 dogs, of 161 breeds, over the course of 20 years. The dogs came from Europe, North America, Africa, and Asia.

For example, herding dogs, such as shepherds, collies and shelties, cluster into one clade, whereas hunting dogs, such as retrievers and setters, cluster into another clade.

This clustering indicates that dogs were originally bred for specific purposes before breeders began selecting for specific physical traits that are commonly associated with distinct breeds today.

It seems that people started breeding dogs for particular traits in multiple places at once. For instance, with the advent of agriculture, humans in multiple places in the world employed dogs for herding and guarding livestock.

When dog fighting was a popular form of entertainment, many combinations of terriers and mastiff or bully-type breeds were crossed to create dogs that would excel in the fighting ring. In this analysis, all of the bull and terrier crosses go back to the terriers of Ireland 18601870.

Later on, dogs were bred for more specific tasks. Golden Retrievers, Irish Setters, and other gun dogs, can be traced to Victorian England where these breeds were bred as retrievers, helpers and companions to hunters.

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New research shows that all dog breeds come from the gray wolf – Bosveld Review

New research shows that all dog breeds come from the gray wolf – Lowvelder

Dogs and humans have been living together for at least 15 000 years.

Dogs were domesticated thousands of years ago as companions to humans and bred for different traits. The desired traits changed over the centuries resulting in different breeds.

As humans migrated to different places on the planet over the millennia, their dogs went with them.

A team of researchers has assembled the most comprehensive genomic map on dogs to date. The results were published in the journal Cell Reports.

Researchers gathered blood samples or mouth scrapings from 1,346 dogs, of 161 breeds, over the course of 20 years. The dogs came from Europe, North America, Africa, and Asia.

For example, herding dogs, such as shepherds, collies and shelties, cluster into one clade, whereas hunting dogs, such as retrievers and setters, cluster into another clade.

This clustering indicates that dogs were originally bred for specific purposes before breeders began selecting for specific physical traits that are commonly associated with distinct breeds today.

It seems that people started breeding dogs for particular traits in multiple places at once. For instance, with the advent of agriculture, humans in multiple places in the world employed dogs for herding and guarding livestock.

When dog fighting was a popular form of entertainment, many combinations of terriers and mastiff or bully-type breeds were crossed to create dogs that would excel in the fighting ring. In this analysis, all of the bull and terrier crosses go back to the terriers of Ireland 18601870.

Later on, dogs were bred for more specific tasks. Golden Retrievers, Irish Setters, and other gun dogs, can be traced to Victorian England where these breeds were bred as retrievers, helpers and companions to hunters.

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New research shows that all dog breeds come from the gray wolf – Lowvelder