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A special dog used to help people is getting some much-needed help of her own at a Virginia clinic.

Red, a 12-year-old black Labrador, is one of the last surviving search-and-rescue dogs deployed during the 9/11 attacks, Fox affiliate WTTG-TV reported.

Her handler, Heather Roche, told the station that Red was recently certified when the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, occurred, saying the search-and-rescue operation that followed was her first big mission.

Red’s job was to find DNA evidence at the Pentagon’s north parking lot with 26 other dogs, according to Roche, who said she did a “fantastic job.”

“I got her as a puppy … You have to convince [her] everything that she does, whether it’s climbing ladders or any kind of search, that it’s her idea,” Roche told WTTG. “No matter what I’ve asked her to do, she’s done it and she’s done it flawlessly.”

But in her old age, Red developed crippling arthritis and underwent stem cell regenerative therapy Monday to help ease her pain so she can get back out on the job.

Dr. John Herrity of Burke Animal Clinic in Burke, Va., told the station that “Red has a back issue that, after a fall from a ladder, has not really been right, and has been living in pain, so we’re going to give those stem cells IV [intravenously] and then also inject them along the back to try to help Red’s comfort.”

“She’s had a great career and has made a difference to a lot of families by bringing their loved ones home,” Roche said.

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9/11 search and rescue dog receives stem cell therapy at Virginia clinic

By NewsCore

March 20, 2012

BURKE, Va. — A special dog used to help people is getting some much-needed help of her own at a Virginia clinic, myFOXdc.com reported Monday.

Red, a 12-year-old black Labrador, is one of the last surviving search and rescue dogs deployed during the 9/11 attacks.

Her handler, Heather Roche, told WTTG-TV that Red was recently certified when Sept. 11, 2001, occurred, and the devastating terror attacks were her first big mission.

Red’s job was to find DNA evidence at The Pentagon’s north parking lot with 26 other dogs, and according to Roche, she did a “fantastic job.”

“I got her as a puppy … You have to convince [her] everything that she does, whether it’s climbing ladders or any kind of search, that it’s her idea,” Roche told WTTG-TV. “No matter what I’ve asked her to do, she’s done it and she’s done it flawlessly.”

But in her old age Red developed crippling arthritis, and underwent stem cell regenerative therapy Monday to help ease her pain so she can get back out on the job.

Dr. John Herrity of Burke Animal Clinic in Burke, Va., told WTTG-TV, “Red has a back issue that, after a fall from a ladder has not really been right, and has been living in pain, so we’re going to give those stem cells IV [intravenously] and then also inject them along the back to try to help Red’s comfort.”

“She’s had a great career and has made a difference to a lot of families by bringing their loved ones home,” Roche said.

See more here:
9/11 search and rescue dog receives stem cell therapy at Virginia clinic

9/11 search and rescue dog receives stem cell therapy

A special dog used to help people is getting some much-needed help of her own at a Virginia clinic, myFOXdc.com reported.

Red, a 12-year-old black Labrador, is one of the last surviving search and rescue dogs deployed during the 9/11 attacks.

Her handler, Heather Roche, told WTTG-TV that Red was recently certified when Sept. 11, 2001, occurred, and the devastating terror attacks were her first big mission.

Red’s job was to find DNA evidence at The Pentagon’s north parking lot with 26 other dogs, and according to Roche, she did a “fantastic job.”

“I got her as a puppy … You have to convince [her] everything that she does, whether it’s climbing ladders or any kind of search, that it’s her idea,” Roche told WTTG-TV. “No matter what I’ve asked her to do, she’s done it and she’s done it flawlessly.”

But in her old age Red developed crippling arthritis, and underwent stem cell regenerative therapy Monday to help ease her pain so she can get back out on the job.

Dr. John Herrity of Burke Animal Clinic in Burke, Va., told WTTG-TV, “Red has a back issue that, after a fall from a ladder has not really been right, and has been living in pain, so we’re going to give those stem cells IV [intravenously] and then also inject them along the back to try to help Red’s comfort.”

“She’s had a great career and has made a difference to a lot of families by bringing their loved ones home,” Roche said.

Click here to read more.

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9/11 search and rescue dog receives stem cell therapy

9/11 Search And Rescue Dog Gets Stem Cell Treatment

BURKE, Va. (WUSA) — Red, a black lab from Annapolis, has spent the last ten years as a search and rescue dog. Her missions have included Hurricane Katrina, the La Plata tornadoes, and the Pentagon after 9/11.

“The search and rescue dogs at the Pentagon are credited with finding 70% of the human remains,” said Heather Roche, Red’s owner and handler. “That helped a whole lot of those families actually get closure.”

At just under two years old, 9/11 was Red’s first search. Today, she’s one of the last 9/11 search and rescue dogs still alive. She retired last July due to severe arthritis.

“The last few months, she would like to be a couch potato but she can’t even get on the couch any more,” said Roche. “It would be nice if she could do those kinds of things that she misses.”

Roche brought Red to the Burke Animal Clinic for stem cell regenerative therapy compliments of MediVet America, the company that developed the in-clinic stem cell technology.

“This is a small something that we can give back as a way of saying thanks for what you guys have done for us,” said Dr. John Herrity at the Burke Animal Clinic. “We are just taking fat from Red’s side and then we are going to spin it down, process it, extract the stem cells from there.”

Red received her first injection just a few hours after she woke up from surgery. The rest of her extracted stem cells will be stored free of charge for use in follow-up treatments.

“We’ve done about 28 dogs and of those dogs we’ve had about 75-80% of them doing very well,” said Dr. Herrity.

Two other 9/11 dogs that recently received the same stem cell therapy are able to run, climb, and play again. Dr. Herrity’s own dog, Bradley, is living proof that the treatment works. Bradley received the same stem cell treatment about one year ago and he’s made great progress.

“Hopefully in about 2-3 months, she will be more comfortable, moving around, wanting to play more,” said Dr. Herrity.

Continued here:
9/11 Search And Rescue Dog Gets Stem Cell Treatment

Hero Dog Receives Stem Cell Therapy

Stem Cell Therapy Helping Heroic Dogs Recover

News4’s Darcy Spencer explains how a breakthrough treatment is helping search and rescue dogs like Red recover after years of working in disaster zones.

A breakthrough treatment is helping area search-and-rescue dogs that played key roles on Sept. 11, 2001, and during other disasters.

Red’s first assignment as a search, rescue and recovery dog was at the Pentagon following the 9/11 attacks. Years of rescue work and a 12-foot fall from a ladder have taken a toll. Arthritis forced Red into retirement in July and turned her into a couch potato.

The 12-year-old black lab received a breakthrough stem cell treatment today that will ease her pain and give her more mobility.

Her veterinarian, Dr. John Herrity, of the Burke Animal Clinic, has done more than two dozen of the stem cell operations developed by Medivet America, which also donated the cost of the procedure.

The treatment won’t bring Red back out of retirement, but it is expected to put spring back in her step within a couple of months.

Two other 9/11 search-and-rescued dogs have been treated with stem cell therapy and are back to their normal activities.

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Hero Dog Receives Stem Cell Therapy

Ocala Veterinarian Announces Free Online Veterinary Resources

OCALA, FL–(Marketwire -03/18/12)- Town & Country Animal Hospital announced that the veterinary practice has launched a new website with veterinary care resources for pet owners. The website, http://www.bestocalavet.com/, is designed to make it easy for pet owners to find accurate, reliable answers to their animal care questions. The veterinary hospital provides comprehensive pet care services, including pet wellness, spay neuter operations, and advanced treatments including orthopedic surgery, veterinary dermatology and pet stem cell therapy. Pet owners can learn more about these procedures, as well as general pet care tips, by visiting the new website.

Ocala pet owners have a new, free veterinary resource for answering their pet care questions. Dr. Kelly Culbertson, a veterinarian with Town & Country Animal Hospital, stated, “The new website is packed with up-to-date information on the latest veterinary care procedures, and designed to answer all kinds of pet care questions. Additionally, pet owners can get to know our wonderful staff, visit pet portals for information on their pet’s healthcare, and order from our online store.”

Dr. Culbertson, along with Ocala veterinarians Dr. Pam Neiser, Dr. Leah Smith, Dr. Derek Parkin and Dr. Sarah Quigley, are part of the veterinary hospital care team that has been serving local pet owners for over 15 years.

“We’re proud to be part of the community for over 15 years, and our new website is a natural extension of our commitment to serving pet owners,” said Dr. Culbertson. “Features like the Vetopedia and Video Newsroom make basic pet care tips accessible to everyone, any time of the day or night.”

The Veterinary Topics library also includes information targeted to new pet owners, including tips for how to introduce a new pet into a family. There is basic training information, along with tips for grooming, pet nutrition and a checklist for recognizing the signs of illness in pets.

The Video Newsroom includes a variety of how-to videos, including those for at-home dog dental cleaning and tips for seasonal pet care. The Vetopedia is designed to explain a variety of veterinary terminology and answer questions pet owners may have about different procedures.

Town & Country is one of the only animal hospitals to offer fat stem cell therapy, as well as advanced orthopedic surgeries. Dr. Culbertson is the only Ocala veterinarian to perform Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteostomy (TPLO) surgery. Pet owners can learn more about these treatments, as well as the veterinary hospital’s vet dermatology practice, on the practice’s new website.

“We are excited to offer these revolutionary treatments for canine arthritis and soft tissue injuries,” said Dr. Culbertson. “Whenever possible, our minimally invasive procedures and laser treatments ensure less pain and swelling, as well as shorter recovery periods. The new website is a great resource for learning more about alternative treatments like stem cell therapy and TPLO surgery.”

Pet owners who wish to learn more about these procedures and other veterinary care treatments may visit the website at http://www.BestOcalaVet.com.

Originally posted here:
Ocala Veterinarian Announces Free Online Veterinary Resources

Presentations at the Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting Demonstrate Superior Predictivity of Cellular Dynamics …

MADISON, Wis., March 8, 2012 /PRNewswire/ –Cellular Dynamics International, Inc. (CDI), the world’s largest commercial producer of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines and tissue cells for drug discovery and safety, today announced several customer presentations of studies employing the company’s iCell products at the Society of Toxicology (SOT) Annual Meeting on March 11 to 15 in San Francisco. A number of these studies demonstrate the superior predictivity of CDI’s human iPS cell-derived products compared to other cell models, such as animal models and immortalized cell lines, which are historically used in pharmaceutical drug discovery and toxicity testing.

Customers will present 11 abstracts employing CDI’s human cells in their research during the SOT meeting. Several of these compare the superior ability of CDI’s iCell Cardiomyocytes and iCell Hepatocytes to predict toxic responses to currently available cell models. Among them:

Puppala, D et al. (Abstract 420 Poster Board -642; Pfizer, Inc.) compared the ability of iCell Cardiomyocytes to a rat cardiac-derived cell line (H9C2) to predict the toxicity of 10 known in vivo cardiac toxins that were not flagged by the company’s current in vitro assay systems. They found that iCell Cardiomyocytes showed increases in several toxicity signals and were more accurate in detecting cardiotoxicity than the rat cell line.

Guo, L et al. (Abstract 1168 Poster Board -433; Hoffman-La Roche) utilized sets of reference and internal compounds to determine the accuracy with which iCell Cardiomyocytes can predict arrhythmic effects. Based on drug-induced changes in beating pattern, iCell Cardiomyocytes correctly identified 17 of 19 reference compounds known to cause abnormal ECG patterns in humans and 17 of 17 internal compounds known to cause arrhythmia in non-rodent animals. These results demonstrate the predictive value of utilizing iCell Cardiomyocytes to identify proarrhythmic compounds.

Hong, S et al. (Abstract 1149 Poster Board -414; Bristol-Myers Squibb) evaluated the effects of three drug compounds using both iCell Cardiomyocytes and fetal rat cardiomyocytes utilizing multi-electrode array (MEA) assays. For all three compounds, iCell Cardiomyocytes were better suited than the fetal rat cardiomyocytes at predicting adverse in vivo effects, including those effects that were not discovered until small-scale clinical trials.

Kameoka, S et al. (Abstract 519 Poster Board -237; Hoffman-La Roche) compared the toxicity of three drug candidates previously tested on dog hepatocytes to iCell Hepatocytes and primary human hepatocytes. In dogs, two of the three compounds caused liver toxicity. The profiles of the two toxic compounds were almost identically recapitulated in vitro for both the primary human hepatocytes and iCell Hepatocytes. This study demonstrated that iCell Hepatocytes may be a valuable human model to predict hepatic toxicity in vitro.

Additional SOT presentations employing CDI’s iCell products can be found on the SOT Annual Meeting website or at http://www.cellulardynamics.com/sot2012/posters.html.

“These studies are important contributors to the collective understanding that human in vitro cellular model systems are superior to animal models and immortalized cell lines when studying questions of human biology,” said Chris Parker, chief commercial officer of CDI. “We recognize that iPS cell-derived tissues are a relatively new model for drug discovery and toxicity testing and must be validated and shown to be superior. It is gratifying that our pharmaceutical customers are presenting data validating the performance characteristics of our heart and liver cells in such an open scientific forum as the Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting. Third-party validation of iCell product performance coupled with CDI’s proven ability to deliver human cells in the quantity, quality and purity required for pharmaceutical, biomedical and basic research positions us well for supplying customers with the human cells they need to improve healthcare.”

About Cellular Dynamics International, Inc.Cellular Dynamics International, Inc. (CDI) is a leading developer of next-generation stem cell technologies for drug development, cell therapy, tissue engineering and organ regeneration. CDI harnesses its unique manufacturing technology to produce differentiated tissue cells from any individual’s stem cell line in industrial quality, quantity and purity. CDI is accelerating the adoption of pluripotent stem cell technology, adapting its methods to fit into standard clinical practice by the creation of individual stem cell lines from a standard blood draw. CDI was founded in 2004 by Dr. James Thomson, a pioneer in human pluripotent stem cell research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. CDI’s facilities are located in Madison, Wisconsin. See http://www.cellulardynamics.com.

MEDIA CONTACTS:Joleen Rau Senior Director, Marketing & Communications Cellular Dynamics International, Inc. 608 310-5142 jrau@cellulardynamics.com

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Presentations at the Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting Demonstrate Superior Predictivity of Cellular Dynamics …

On the leading edge

PETS are complex creatures that deserve the same special care and attention as their human friends.

Contemporary pet care takes this approach by offering many of the same thorough treatments available to humans.

Leading the way is Forbes Street Vet Clinic, which has recently relocated to a new and larger purpose-built practice.

Owners Dr Lorraine Vella and Dr Bob Clippingdale said the new facilities would allow them to bring the best services to their clients.

''The end result is happier staff members, pets and owners,’’ Dr Vella said.

One of the interesting and valuable features of the new premises is the separate surgery and prep area and

cat and dog wards that promote the happiness of pets.

''The animals are much calmer with their own space,’’ Dr Vella said.

''Their mental health is very important to us.’’

There are also twice as many consultation rooms as before, which allows for easier access to vets.

Another fantastic feature is the extensive off-street parking.

Forbes Street Vet Clinic takes an innovative approach to pet care and extends it services beyond the

essentials.

Behavioura l consults allow clients to work with the vet to find long-term solutions.

''We treat behavioural issues like spraying cats and barking dogs,’’ Dr Vella said.

The clinic also offers ultrasound, radiography, internal medicine and stem cell therapy for arthritic patients.

Alternative therapies such as acupuncture, chiropractics and herbal medicine are also available.

Open day

What: Forbes Street Vet Clinic Open Day.

The friendly staff will be there to give you a tour of the new facilities and there will be plenty of children’s

entertainment including face painting and colour-ins.

Funds raised from the sausage sizzle will be donated to the dogs’ home.

When: March 4, 10.30am-2pm.

Further information: 6424 1675.

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On the leading edge

Stem cell treatment for animals – Video


26-01-2012 02:37 Animacel ltd. is offering your animal stem cell treatment with newly developed stem cell therapy. At the moment, excellent results are with treatments of different joint problems (arthritis and injury/damage of cartilage, hip dysplasia), tendon problems and supporting/adjuvant stem cell therapy for faster healing of broken bones. We are also developing treatment for heart insufficiency, eye dissease, diabetes, etc. See our webpage http://www.animacel.com

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Stem cell treatment for animals – Video

Stem cell treatments for paralyzed dogs – Video


13-02-2012 13:27 NC State neurologist Dr. Natasha Olby is studying a promising new treatment for paralyzed dogs. Olby has used stem cell treatments to restore partial use of the legs and bladder control to dogs with spinal cord injuries. Her research holds promise for humans, too. A full transcript of this video is available at http://www.ncsu.edu

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Stem cell treatments for paralyzed dogs – Video