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Why Stem Cell Therapy for Pets? | MediVet Biologics

What happens to my pet when they come in for stem cell therapy?

First, your vet will put your pet under general anesthetic. Then, he/she will make a small incision and collect 2-4 tablespoons of fat (either in the belly or behind the shoulder blades). MediVet provides on-site training for each clinic that brings on Stem Cell treatments; the process ensures your pets cells will be isolated and activated in a proper manner.

The surgical time requiring anesthesia is typically less than 30 minutes. The cells are isolated, activated and re-administered on site so that your animal can go home same day.

What is the recovery period, and how long does it take to see results?

We recommend that the patient be limited to activity within the first 10 days. It is likely your pet will be feeling good and want to exert themselves, however we recommend limiting physical activity so the cells have the ability to work to repair injuries. Improvements are typically seen within the first two weeks and continue improve over the next few months. Veterinarians report responses from initial treatments lasting 18-24 months. Rehabilitation Schedule.

MediVets patented stem cell procedure allows your vet to isolate stem cells from your animals own fat tissue, activate them, and reintroduce them directly into the damaged areas all in one visit. The goal of this revolutionary procedure is to provide a potent anti-inflammatory effect promoting cartilage and other tissue regeneration ultimately creating a healthier environment for the affected area. Most importantly, its an all-natural approach to healing without the adverse side effects. One example, in the case of arthritis, stem cells can become new cartilage cells, thus reducing pain and increasing mobility.

How long does a treatment last? What happens if my pet starts having trouble again?

We typically see about 18-24 months of relief after the initial treatment and even longer when treatment is sought at earlier stages. Most pet owners chose to bank cells, so re-treatment is easy and cost effective. MediVet has banking facilities in Kentucky, Australia and Europe. If symptoms return, your vet merely requests a dose of cells from the bank, and injects them. No surgery is necessary.

How long has this been available?

Stem cell therapy for animals has been commercially available since 2004. MediVet pioneered in-clinic treatment options around 2010 and has now successfully treated thousands of animals globally.

What is so great about Stem Cell Therapy?

Stem cells treat the source of the problem by becoming new tissue replacing damaged tissue. Other treatments, such as NSAIDs, merely attempt to reduce symptoms. The treatment is very low risk, because it uses the animals own stem cells. With MediVets technology in a recent study conducted by four independent Veterinarians over 95% of animals treated show improvement. For pet owners, there are two main advantages to MediVet.

155 Canine Study

What conditions do you treat?

Our typical patient has osteoarthritis (hip dysplasia, degenerative joint disease, calcifications, common degeneration and inflammation), soft tissue injuries (cruciate injuries, tears, ruptures, inflammation), or needs accelerated healing of fractures. We know a lot about these conditions, and over 95% of these patients get better, with MediVets Stem Cell Therapy.We also treat other cases under compassionate use. We know less about these conditions, but are seeing some exciting results. Some of those conditions are: degenerative myelopathy, feline gingivitis, end-stage renal disease, liver and kidney failure, allergy, auto-immune, inflammatory bowel disease, pulmonary fibrosis, IMHA, atopy, and spine trauma. Please talk to your vet if you have questions about any of these conditions or would like to submit your animal for a compassionate use trial.

Is it safe?

Yes, this procedure is very safe. The biggest risk as in any surgical procedure is using anesthetic, to remove the fat tissue. On a typical dog, Veterinarians report this procedure is easier than a spay. The fat is collected in about 20 minutes by your vet. Processing the sample is done carefully by a highly trained Vet tech carefully trained by MediVet. In the thousands of animals treated, we have not observed any significant negative side-effects from MediVets stem cell therapy.

KSU Study Double blind placebo controlled study of Osteoarthritis model

UK Study The only validated independent comparative analysis done of MediVets Stem Cell Therapy Procedure (Stromal Vascular Fraction (SVF)

KSU Study Double blind controlled study of Atopic Dermatitis using MediVets Stem Cell Therapy Procedure (Stromal Vascular Fraction therapy (21 dogs)

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Why Stem Cell Therapy for Pets? | MediVet Biologics

Concerns over paraplegic dog’s treatment – INFORUM

Tommy, our beloved 8-year-old border collie mix, was diagnosed by MRI with an inoperable tumor on his spinal cord. We had difficulty diagnosing what appeared to be a weak leg, and he began to cry out occasionally as he climbed stairs. We escalated, and our vet referred us to an MRI immediately.

After the diagnosis, the vet specialist said that Tommy was quite stoic because he did not cry out more often, given the location of the tumor. We knew he was not himself, but what we did not know was the level of pain that he lived with that last month of his life.

I question the motivation of these people: How on Earth (in their own words) “during four weeks of screaming in pain” did they not decide that perhaps it was time to let Chuckie go? Who knows what pain he endures now? I was saddened to see that their own motivations have overtaken their empathy for what might be in the best interest of Chuckie.M.J., Manchester, Mo.

Dear Dr. Fox: I was dismayed by the excessive treatment the letter-writer has gotten and is getting for a paraplegic dog. I love animals, have taken good care of my pets and have volunteered and donated to the Missouri Humane Society, so it isn’t that I’m anti-animal, but I think what the writer has done for this one dog is too much.

Just think of the hundreds and hundreds of dogs in shelters and the care some of the healthier ones could get if the writer stopped at sensible treatment for that one dog. Actually, that dog is getting better and more extensive care than some children. Enough is enough in trying to help a pet.R.B., Kirkwood, Mo.

Dear M.J. and R.B.: The money that caring people sometimes put out for their beloved animal companions, especially with advances in cancer treatments and stem cell therapies, can be very considerable. Are they being selfish? What then of their love and concern?

Some do choose instead to opt for euthanasia, especially when there is a low chance of recovery, and give a large donation in their animal’s name to their local animal shelter or rescue organization.

We cannot compare the quality of medical care and what might be spent on a child in a poor village with a toy poodle in New York City suffering from comparable conditions, nor their chances of recovery. Such situational ethics are confounded by other social and family priorities, availability of services and where there is choice, just how much one feels like spending and can afford in the hope that the loved one will recover. It is a tragedy of the times that here in America, families can be bankrupted by the medical bills of one member under cancer treatment.

Just as we see with people, dogs do vary greatly in their pain tolerance; some are more stoic than others, who may border on hysteria because of fear as well as pain. This is where the experienced clinical eye of the veterinarian is invaluable to determine the best course of treatment and the animal patient’s quality of life and chances of total or partial recovery.

Regardless of costs and affordability and the fact that some animal caregivers may seek to extend an animal’s life for various personal reasons rather than for the animal’s own sake, all involved have a duty to make the animal patient as comfortable as possible and give the animal a chance where there is a strong will to live.

Being nursed at home or setting up in-home palliative care with a visiting veterinarian may be preferable to long-term hospitalization where recovery may be protracted or arrested by separation anxiety and loss of the will to live.

Send all mail to animaldocfox@gmail.com or to Dr. Michael Fox in care of Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106. The volume of mail received prohibits personal replies, but questions and comments of general interest will be discussed in future columns. Visit Dr. Fox’s website at http://www.drfoxvet.net.

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Concerns over paraplegic dog’s treatment – INFORUM

Animal Stem Cell Therapy Market: Outlook Continues to Remain Positive by 2017 2025 – LANews By Abhishek Budholiya (press release) (blog)

Animal stem cell therapy is a usage of animals stem cell to treat a disease or disorder. The ability of stem cell is to divide and differentiate into a cell with specialized function useful for repairing body tissues damaged by injury or disease. The animal stem cell therapy process involve three steps which include collection of stem cell sample from animals and preparing the sample to concentrate the stem cells. Finally, the therapy includes transferring the stem cells into the injured site for treatment. Animal stem cell therapy increases the expectancy of life in animals with no side effects. It is available for the treatment of arthritis, degenerative joint disorders, tendon, and ligaments injuries in animals. Stem cell therapy is most often used to treat dogs, cats, and horses. But recent developments made it possible to use animal stem cell therapy in tiger, pig, etc. Present animal stem cell therapy is studied in treatments of the inflammatory bowel, kidney, liver, heart and immune-mediated diseases respectively.

Animal Stem Cell Therapy Market Drivers and Restraints,Segmentation,Region-wise Overview and Key Participants:

Increasing prevalence of disease in animals with growing population and to increase the animals quality of life, the companies focus shifting towards animal stem cell therapies. Along with increasing government funding for the protection of animals and fast approvals of FDA contributing towards the rapid growth of the animal stem cell therapy. The research in animal stem cells offers great promise for understanding underlying mechanisms of animal development; it gives great opportunities to treat a broad range of diseases and conditions in animals. Animal stem cell therapy is increasingly recognized as critical translational models of human disease for treatment. All these factors act as drivers for the robust growth of the animal stem cell therapy market.

There are little evidence-based preclinical animal studies acts as restraint in the animal stem cell therapy market. The evidence-based clinical trials of animal stem cell therapy provide tremendous opportunities for the efficient advancement of other species.

Segmentation based on Applications: Dog, Cat, Horse, Others;Segmentation based on End-user: Veterinary hospitals, Veterinary Clinics, Research organizations.

Studies in the animal stem cell therapy continue at a breathtaking pace due to increasing demand and treatment cost covered in reimbursements. And animal stem cell therapy is more effective than traditional treatment available in the market which is boosting the companies to increase the spending in the R&D for innovative methods. Because of the novelty and complexity of animal stem cell therapy, FDA encourages individuals, universities and drug companies for further innovations. The future expected with double CAGR during the forecasted period.

Regarding geographies, North America is dominating the global animal stem cell therapy market due to the increased incidence rate and awareness about the therapy. U.S represents the largest market share in the North America due to the increasing demand for the therapy. Europe and Asia-Pacific are showing a significant growth rate during the forecasted period due to the growing adoption of the animal stem cell therapy. The animal stem cell therapy market in underdeveloped countries is slow when compared to the developed countries.

The key participants in the animal stem cell therapy market are Magellan Stem Cells, ANIMAL CELL THERAPIES, Abbott Animal Hospital, VETSTEM BIOPHARMA, Veterinary Hospital and Clinic Frisco, CO, etc. The companies are entering into the collaboration and partnership to keep up the pace of the innovations.

A sample of this report is available upon request @https://www.persistencemarketresearch.com/samples/14941

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Animal Stem Cell Therapy Market: Outlook Continues to Remain Positive by 2017 2025 – LANews By Abhishek Budholiya (press release) (blog)

Spike in drugs found at Wandsworth Prison after sniffer dog handler … – Evening Standard

Britains largest prison is failing to stem the flow of drugs into cells after its sniffer dog had time off and amid a shortage of CCTV operators, its monitors said today.

The Independent Monitoring Board for Wandsworth Prison said illicit substances were fuelling violence as it issued a highly critical report on conditions.

In one month, dog searches were conducted on only 10 out of 31 days.

It said: It had been intended that Wandsworth should be a hub for the new regional dog team but no new staff were appointed and there was no cover made available when the one dog handler went on training or leave.

As a result dog searches had decreased.

The security risk was worsened by the lack of operational CCTV to monitor visitors.

Drug failure: Wandsworth prison (Picture: Nigel Howard)

The board warned that Wandsworth had once again been unable to provide a consistently safe, decent and humane environment for its 1,600 prisoners over the past year.

It blamed the failure on severe staff shortages which were undermining the efforts of the prisons strong management team and hard-pressed officers and affecting almost every aspect of prison life.

The resulting problems included prisoners being locked in their cells for excessive periods. This was causing boredom and frustration and contributing to high levels of violence.

Staff shortages were also preventing education and training which was vital to the process of rehabilitating offenders and preventing recidivism.

On the drugs problem, the board said there were almost daily drone deliveries last summer, helped by the large number of smashed cell windows, but that airborne smuggling had decreased sharply after a police car chase of a suspected drone operator resulted in a fatality.

Other measures had also helped and there had been no known drone deliveries since last September.

Other forms of smuggling continued. Several staff had been excluded after being subjected to X-ray and dog searches. But the amount of contraband being brought in by visitors remained relatively high because of the lack of staff to monitor CCTV or conduct sniffer dog checks.

The boards report also disclosed that about 40 per cent of Wandsworths inmates are foreign nationals, with 112 Poles forming the largest contingent.

The Ministry of Justice said recruitment of dog handlers was under way at a regional level and that posts at Wandsworth are expected to be filled in the near future.

It added: Wandsworth has already taken action to address a number of concerns raised in the report, including a targeted, local recruitment campaign which has already begun to boost the number of prison officers in post.

The prison has also put in place new measures to tackle the supply and use of illegal contraband. This includes the recruitment of new dog handler posts to step up drug detection.

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Spike in drugs found at Wandsworth Prison after sniffer dog handler … – Evening Standard

Fetal membranes may help transform regenerative medicine – Medical Xpress

A new review looks at the potential of fetal membranes, which make up the amniotic sac surrounding the fetus during pregnancy, for regenerative medicine.

Fetal membranes have been used as biological bandages for skin grafts as well as for serious burns. They may also have numerous other applications because they contain a variety of stem cells, which might be used to treat cardiovascular and neurological diseases, diabetes, and other medical conditions.

“The fetal membranes have been used successfully in medical applications for over a century, but we continue to discover new properties of these membranes,” said Dr. Rebecca Lim, author of the STEM CELLS Translational Medicine review. “The stem cell populations arising from the fetal membranes are plentiful and diverse, while the membrane itself serves as a unique biocompatible scaffold for bioengineering applications.”

Explore further: Stem cell research could prevent premature births

More information: Rebecca Lim. Concise Review: Fetal Membranes in Regenerative Medicine: New Tricks from an Old Dog?, STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (2017). DOI: 10.1002/sctm.16-0447

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Fetal membranes may help transform regenerative medicine – Medical Xpress

Stem cell treatment for children with spina bifida helps puppies first – University of California

A pair of English bulldog puppies are the first patients to be successfully treated with a unique therapy a combination of surgery and stem cells developed at the University of California, Davis, to help preserve lower-limb function in children with spina bifida.

Because dogs with the birth defect frequently have little control of their hindquarters, they also have little hope for a future. They are typically euthanized as puppies.

At their postsurgery re-check at 4 months old, however, the siblings, named Darla and Spanky, showed off their abilities to walk, run and play to their doctor,veterinary neurosurgeon Beverly Sturges.

The initial results of the surgery are promising, as far as hind limb control, said Sturges. Both dogs seemed to have improved range of motion and control of their limbs.

The dogs have since been adopted, and continue to do well at their home in New Mexico.

Spina bifida occurs when spinal tissue improperly fuses in utero, causing a range of cognitive, mobility, urinary and bowel disabilities in about 1,500 to 2,000 children born in the U.S. each year. The dogs procedure, which involved surgical techniques developed byfetal surgeon Diana Farmerof UC Davis Health together with a cellular treatment developed by stem cell scientistsAijun WangandDori Borjesson, director of the universitysVeterinary Institute for Regenerative Cures, represents a major step toward curing spina bifida for both humans and dogs.

Farmer pioneered the use of surgery prior to birth to improve brain development in children with spina bifida. She later showed that prenatal surgery combined with human placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (PMSCs), held in place with a cellular scaffold, helped research lambs born with the disorder walk without noticeable disability.

Sturges wanted to find out if the surgery-plus-stem-cell approach could give dogs closer-to-normal lives along with better chances of survival and adoption. At 10-weeks old, Darla and Spanky were transported from Southern California Bulldog Rescue to the UC Davis veterinary hospital, where they were the first dogs to receive the treatment, this time using canine instead of human PMSCs.

Another distinction for Darla and Spanky is that their treatment occurred after birth, since prenatal diagnosis of spina bifida is not performed on dogs, Sturges explained. The disorder becomes apparent between 1 and 2 weeks of age, when puppies show hind-end weakness, poor muscle tone, incoordination and abnormal use of their tails.

UC Davis is the only place where this type of cross-disciplinary, transformational medicine could happen, according to Farmer.

Its rare to have a combination of excellent medical and veterinary schools and strong commitment to advancing stem cell science at one institution, she said.

UC Davis is also home to the One Healthinitiative aimed at finding novel treatmentslike thesefor diseases that affect both humans and animals.

Ive often said that I have the greatest job on the planet, because I get to help kids, Farmer said. Now my job is even better, because I get to help puppies too.

With additional evaluation and U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval, Farmer and Wang hope to test the therapy in human clinical trials. Sturges and Borjesson hope to do the same with a canine clinical trial. They hope the outcomes of their work help eradicate spina bifida in dogs and humans.

In the meantime, the team wants dog breeders to send more puppies with spina bifida to UC Davis for treatment and refinements that help the researchers fix an additional hallmark of spina bifida incontinence. While Darla and Spanky are very mobile and doing well on their feet, they still require diapers.

Further analysis of their progress will determine if the surgery improves their incontinence conditions, Sturges said.

Funding for this project was provided by the Veterinary Institute for Regenerative Cures (VIRC) at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, and the Surgical Bioengineering Lab at the UC Davis School of Medicine. Private donations to the veterinary school for stem cell research also contributed to this procedure. Farmer and Wangs spina bifida research is supported by funding from the National Institutes of Health, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Shriners Hospitals for Children and the March of Dimes Foundation.

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Stem cell treatment for children with spina bifida helps puppies first – University of California

Stem Cell Treatment for Children With Spina Bifida Helps Dogs First … – UC Davis

A pair of English bulldog puppies are the first patients to be successfully treated with a unique therapy a combination of surgery and stem cells developed at the University of California, Davis, to help preserve lower-limb function in children with spina bifida.

(Editorsnote: Photos and b-roll available.)

Because dogs with the birth defect frequently have little control of their hindquarters, they also have little hope for a future. They are typically euthanized as puppies.

At their postsurgery re-check at 4 months old, however, the siblings, named Darla and Spanky, showed off their abilities to walk, run and play to their doctor, veterinary neurosurgeon Beverly Sturges.

The initial results of the surgery are promising, as far as hind limb control, said Sturges. Both dogs seemed to have improved range of motion and control of their limbs.

The dogs have since been adopted, and continue to do well at their home in New Mexico.

Spina bifida occurs when spinal tissue improperly fuses in utero, causing a range of cognitive, mobility, urinary and bowel disabilities in about 1,500 to 2,000 children born in the U.S. each year. The dogs procedure, which involved surgical techniques developed by fetal surgeon Diana Farmer of UC Davis Health together with a cellular treatment developed by stem cell scientists Aijun Wang and Dori Borjesson, director of the universitys Veterinary Institute for Regenerative Cures, represents a major step toward curing spina bifida for both humans and dogs.

Farmer pioneered the use of surgery prior to birth to improve brain development in children with spina bifida. She later showed that prenatal surgery combined with human placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (PMSCs), held in place with a cellular scaffold, helped research lambs born with the disorder walk without noticeable disability.

Sturges wanted to find out if the surgery-plus-stem-cell approach could give dogs closer-to-normal lives along with better chances of survival and adoption. At 10-weeks old, Darla and Spanky were transported from Southern California Bulldog Rescue to the UC Davis veterinary hospital, where they were the first dogs to receive the treatment, this time using canine instead of human PMSCs.

Another distinction for Darla and Spanky is that their treatment occurred after birth, since prenatal diagnosis of spina bifida is not performed on dogs, Sturges explained. The disorder becomes apparent between 1 and 2 weeks of age, when puppies show hind-end weakness, poor muscle tone, incoordination and abnormal use of their tails.

UC Davis is the only place where this type of cross-disciplinary, transformational medicine could happen, according to Farmer.

Its rare to have a combination of excellent medical and veterinary schools and strong commitment to advancing stem cell science at one institution, she said.

UC Davis is also home to the One Healthinitiative aimed at finding novel treatments like these for diseases that affect both humans and animals.

Ive often said that I have the greatest job on the planet, because I get to help kids, Farmer said. Now my job is even better, because I get to help puppies too.

With additional evaluation and U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval, Farmer and Wang hope to test the therapy in human clinical trials. Sturges and Borjesson hope to do the same with a canine clinical trial. They hope the outcomes of their work help eradicate spina bifida in dogs and humans.

In the meantime, the team wants dog breeders to send more puppies with spina bifida to UC Davis for treatment and refinements that help the researchers fix an additional hallmark of spina bifida incontinence. While Darla and Spanky are very mobile and doing well on their feet, they still require diapers.

Further analysis of their progress will determine if the surgery improves their incontinence conditions, Sturges said.

Funding for this project was provided by the Veterinary Institute for Regenerative Cures (VIRC) at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, and the Surgical Bioengineering Lab at the UC Davis School of Medicine. Private donations to the veterinary school for stem cell research also contributed to this procedure. Farmer and Wangs spina bifida research is supported by funding from the National Institutes of Health, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Shriners Hospitals for Children and the March of Dimes Foundation.

Excerpt from:
Stem Cell Treatment for Children With Spina Bifida Helps Dogs First … – UC Davis

Terre Haute animal hospital in stem cell study for dogs – WISH-TV

Deana ReecePublished: August 23, 2017, 7:22 pmUpdated: August 23, 2017, 9:34 pm

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (WTWO) Maggie Mae and her owner, Robert Howrey, came from Paris, Illinois, for a check-up at the Wabash Valley Animal Hospital in Terre Haute.

She doesnt act like it, but Maggie Mae is a senior citizen and she has problems with her joints.

Arthritis is a common condition in older dogs and we like to help them out, said Dr. Andrew Pickering, a local veterinarian.

A California company called Animal Cell Therapies has enlisted U.S. veterinarians to participate in a study of using stem cells for dogs with arthritis. Some of the canines in the study receive an injection of stem cells, others get just a saline solution.

Pickering doesnt know which injections Maggie Mae is getting, but she no longer limps. Hes encouraged by the results.

Were hoping this particular type of treatment will cure the condition for a long period of time so we dont have to keep giving the dog medication all the time, Pickering said.

Howrey said its almost like having a new dog.

Its been about six weeks, so now shes back doing normal activities, she runs, she chases squirrels.

The research will continue for several more months. The local clinic is looking for owners who would like to involve their pets. Study participation is free for dogs that qualify. Plus, even the animals that receive the saline injections can get the stem cell treatment once the study is complete.

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Terre Haute animal hospital in stem cell study for dogs – WISH-TV

Stem cell treatment for children with spina bifida helps dogs first – Phys.Org

An English bulldog undergoes surgery for spina bifida at the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital. The dog is part of a pair of puppies being treated for spina bifida through a combination of stem cell therapy and surgery, research made possible through collaboration between the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and UC Davis Health. Credit: Gregory Urquiaga/UC Davis

A pair of English bulldog puppies are the first patients to be successfully treated with a unique therapya combination of surgery and stem cellsdeveloped at the University of California, Davis, to help preserve lower-limb function in children with spina bifida.

Because dogs with the birth defect frequently have little control of their hindquarters, they also have little hope for a future. They are typically euthanized as puppies.

At their postsurgery re-check at 4 months old, however, the siblings, named Darla and Spanky, showed off their abilities to walk, run and play to their doctor, veterinary neurosurgeon Beverly Sturges.

“The initial results of the surgery are promising, as far as hind limb control,” said Sturges. “Both dogs seemed to have improved range of motion and control of their limbs.”

The dogs have since been adopted, and continue to do well at their home in New Mexico.

A major step toward curing spina bifida

Spina bifida occurs when spinal tissue improperly fuses in utero, causing a range of cognitive, mobility, urinary and bowel disabilities in about 1,500 to 2,000 children born in the U.S. each year. The dogs’ procedure, which involved surgical techniques developed by fetal surgeon Diana Farmer of UC Davis Health together with a cellular treatment developed by stem cell scientists Aijun Wang and Dori Borjesson, director of the university’s Veterinary Institute for Regenerative Cures, represents a major step toward curing spina bifida for both humans and dogs.

Farmer pioneered the use of surgery prior to birth to improve brain development in children with spina bifida. She later showed that prenatal surgery combined with human placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (PMSCs), held in place with a cellular scaffold, helped research lambs born with the disorder walk without noticeable disability.

Sturges wanted to find out if the surgery-plus-stem-cell approach could give dogs closer-to-normal lives along with better chances of survival and adoption. At 10-weeks old, Darla and Spanky were transported from Southern California Bulldog Rescue to the UC Davis veterinary hospital, where they were the first dogs to receive the treatment, this time using canine instead of human PMSCs.

Another distinction for Darla and Spanky is that their treatment occurred after birth, since prenatal diagnosis of spina bifida is not performed on dogs, Sturges explained. The disorder becomes apparent between 1 and 2 weeks of age, when puppies show hind-end weakness, poor muscle tone, incoordination and abnormal use of their tails.

A unique environment for collaborative research

UC Davis is the only place where this type of cross-disciplinary, transformational medicine could happen, according to Farmer.

“It’s rare to have a combination of excellent medical and veterinary schools and strong commitment to advancing stem cell science at one institution,” she said.

UC Davis is also home to the One Health initiative aimed at finding novel treatments like these for diseases that affect both humans and animals.

“I’ve often said that I have the greatest job on the planet, because I get to help kids,” Farmer said. “Now my job is even better, because I get to help puppies too.”

Hopes for clinical trials in humans and dogs

With additional evaluation and U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval, Farmer and Wang hope to test the therapy in human clinical trials. Sturges and Borjesson hope to do the same with a canine clinical trial. They hope the outcomes of their work help eradicate spina bifida in dogs and humans.

In the meantime, the team wants dog breeders to send more puppies with spina bifida to UC Davis for treatment and refinements that help the researchers fix an additional hallmark of spina bifidaincontinence. While Darla and Spanky are very mobile and doing well on their feet, they still require diapers.

“Further analysis of their progress will determine if the surgery improves their incontinence conditions,” Sturges said.

Explore further: Prenatal stem cell treatment improves mobility issues caused by spina bifida

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Stem cell treatment for children with spina bifida helps dogs first – Phys.Org

Puppies receive stem cell treatment developed to help children with spina bifida – Sacramento Bee

A procedure combining surgery with stem cell treatment has aided two bulldog puppies with spina bifida and a team of UC Davis researchers hopes to test the therapy in human clinical trials.

The puppies were treated with a therapy developed at UC Davis to help preserve lower-limb function in children with spina bifida, according to a university news release.

Spina bifida occurs when spinal tissue improperly fuses in utero causing cognitive, mobility, urinary and bowel disabilities. Approximately 1,500 to 2,000 children in the United States are born with the condition each year.

Because dogs with the birth defect have little control of their hind quarters, they typically are euthanized as puppies.

After their post-surgery checkup at 4 months old, the sibling pups, Darla and Spanky, showed off their ability to walk, run and play.

The initial results of the surgery are promising, as far as hind limb control, veterinary neurosurgeon Beverly Sturges said in a written statement. Both dogs seemed to have improved range of motion and control of their limbs.

The dogs have since been adopted and continue to do well at home in New Mexico.

The dogs procedure involved surgical techniques developed by fetal surgeon Diana Farmer of UC Davis Health together with a cellullar treatment developed by stem cell scientists Aijun Wang and Dori Borjesson, director of the universitys Veterinary Institute for Regenerative Cures.

Farmer pioneered the use of surgery prior to birth to improve brain development in children with spina bifida. She later showed that prenatal surgery combined with cells derived from the human placenta held in place with a cellular scaffold helped research lambs born with the disorder walk without noticeable disability, the news release said.

Sturges wanted to find out whether the surgery-plus-stem-cell approach could give dogs more normal lives, as well as better chances of survival and adoption.

Darla and Spanky were transported from Southern California Bulldog Rescue to the UC Davis Veterinary hospital when they were 10 weeks old. They were the first dogs to receive the treatment, this time using canine instead of human placenta-derived cells.

The dogs treatment also occurred after birth, because the prenatal diagnosis of spina bifida is not performed on dogs, Sturges said. The disorder becomes apparent between 1 and 2 weeks of ages, when puppies show hind-end weakness, poor muscle tone, and abnormal use of their tails.

The research team wants dog breeders to send more puppies with spina bifida to UC Davis for treatment and refinements that will help researchers correct another hallmark of spina bifida, incontinence. Although Darla and Spanky are mobile and doing well, they still require diapers, the news release said.

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Puppies receive stem cell treatment developed to help children with spina bifida – Sacramento Bee